cultures weird cognition context

We Aren’t the World
behavior

Americans are the Weirdest People in the World

Joe Henrich and his colleagues are shaking the foundations of psychology and economics—and hoping to change the way social scientists think about human behavior and culture. Can they show us how to help societies get better, get geonomic? We excerpt this 2013 article from PS Magazine, Feb 25.

By Ethan Watters

The most interesting thing about cultures may not be in the observable things they do—the rituals, eating preferences, codes of behavior, and the like—but in the way they mold our most fundamental conscious and unconscious thinking and perception.

Again and again one group of people appeared to be particularly unusual when compared to other populations—with perceptions, behaviors, and motivations that were almost always sliding down one end of the human bell curve.

The Weirdest People in the World? By “weird” they meant both unusual and Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic. It is not just our Western habits and cultural preferences that are different from the rest of the world, it appears. The very way we think about ourselves and others—and even the way we perceive reality—makes us distinct from other humans on the planet, not to mention from the vast majority of our ancestors. Among Westerners, the data showed that Americans were often the most unusual, leading the researchers to conclude that “American participants are exceptional even within the unusual population of Westerners—outliers among outliers.”

Given the data, social scientists could not possibly have picked a worse population from which to draw broad generalizations. Researchers had been doing the equivalent of studying penguins while believing that they were learning insights applicable to all birds.

The “weird” Western mind is the most self-aggrandizing and egotistical on the planet: we are more likely to promote ourselves as individuals versus advancing as a group. WEIRD minds are also more analytic, possessing the tendency to telescope in on an object of interest rather than understanding that object in the context of what is around it.

Western urban children grow up so closed off in man-made environments that their brains never form a deep or complex connection to the natural world. Children who grow up constantly interacting with the natural world are much less likely to anthropomorphize other living things into late childhood.

If human cognition is shaped by cultural ideas and behavior, it can’t be studied without taking into account what those ideas and behaviors are and how they are different from place to place.

The amount of knowledge in any culture is far greater than the capacity of individuals to learn or figure it all out on their own. We shape a tool in a certain manner, adhere to a food taboo, or think about fairness in a particular way, not because we individually have figured out that behavior’s adaptive value, but because we instinctively trust our culture to show us the way. Our big brains are evolved to let local culture lead us in life’s dance.

Because of our peculiarly Western way of thinking of ourselves as independent of others, this idea of the culturally shaped mind doesn’t go down very easily. We may have underestimated the impact of culture because the very ideas of being subject to the will of larger historical currents and of unconsciously mimicking the cognition of those around us challenges our Western conception of the self as independent and self-determined. The historical missteps of Western researchers, in other words, have been the predictable consequences of the WEIRD mind doing the thinking.

To read more

JJS: Some powerful ideas have been bad fits with human minds … or is that Western minds? Whatever, understanding better how people from anywhere reason should help us couch our proposals more persuasively. For example, how do you get Americans to redefine property?

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Editor Jeffery J. Smith runs the Forum on Geonomics and helped prepare a course for the UN on geonomics. To take the “Land Rights” course, click here .

Also see:

Your Brain is a Pushover for Certain Stimulii
http://www.progress.org/2012/grovelin.htm

Occupy & Tea Party Join Forces to Protest NDAA
http://www.progress.org/2012/dadavis.htm

Soldier Suicide Rate is Highest in 10 Years
http://www.progress.org/2012/soldiers.htm

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